2017 Summer Institute
Aug
1
Aug 16

2017 Summer Institute

The Ukrainian Art Song Summer Institute will provide an intensive immersion into Ukrainian art songs – the language, poetic realm, musical style, socio-historical context and performance practice – culminating in a final recital for the public. Students will leave this intensive one-week program of master classes, with rich insight into repertoire, style, diction, and poetry, and with the invaluable confidence to perform these songs in future.


Art Songs: Shevchenko And Shakespeare
Mar
12
3:00 pm15:00

Art Songs: Shevchenko And Shakespeare

MARCH 12, 2017, MAZZOLLENI HALL RCM TORONTO

Featuring Pavlo Hunka and Albert Krywolt.

This program embraces the vision of comparing and contrasting the works of two great bards – Taras Shevchenko and William Shakespeare – through the medium of art song.  In this performance, art songs by classical Ukrainian composers which are based on the poems of Shevchenko, will be heard in the first half of the program, followed by a glorious song cycle by contemporary composer, Oleksander Jakovchuk, entitled Song of Love, based on twelve Shakespearean sonnets translated into Ukrainian by OstapTarnawsky.

The rich, resonant voice of Pavlo Hunka, internationally renowned bass-baritone, will perform and interpret the songs accompanied by pianist Albert Krywolt.

A Poet's Love, TSO Pre-concert
Feb
13
7:15 pm19:15

A Poet's Love, TSO Pre-concert

  • Roy Tompson Hall

In the early 1850s, Mykola Lysenko furthered his musical development in Leipzig, Germany, the foremost conservatoire on the European continent at the time. Within days of arriving, he attending a recital of Robert Schumann's 'Dichterliebe', a work he fell in love with.  Shortly afterwards, Mykola returned to Kyiv and immediately set about composing his own Dichterliebe song cycle: A Poet's Love. Lysenko turned to the same book of Heinrich Heine Romantic poems that Schumann himself had drawn on.  He then composed his own 'Poetova Lyubov' - A Poet's Love. 

Three of the texts were identical to Schumann's collection; but then he explored further depths of Romantic poetry, adding his own style, offering a further credence to the word and placing the pianist and singer on equal par on the concert platform. The song cycle became a veritable duet of voice, body and soul.